Green Monster Power Smoothie

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No pretty pictures, I know, but healthy and yummy none the less 🙂

There are great benefits to eating lots of greens, yes, you all heard it before, but some days it is hard to fit all that healthy stuff into your food chain between running from work to get the kids or whatever your busy life dictates. Well for days when you don’t have the time to sit down to a hearty spinach omelet you can, even if you don’t have a juicer, make yourself this amazing tasting green power smoothie. Having a juicer can be a great addition to your healthy diet, as long as you’re aware of he fact that you’ll be missing out on all the healthy fiber that you would have consumed eating the veggies. I also want to caution you on juicing fruit, you definitely want to stay HEAVY on the vegetable side. Fruit juice no matter if store-bought or homemade will affect your blood sugar level drastically, much more so than eating the whole fruit would have done. From a weight loss and even a ‘having even energy all day’ point of view, not a good thing. And if you are borderline pre diabetic, just plain BAD idea.

So in this Smoothie you’re not only going to get your greens (without feeling like a cow on the pasture) but all the healthy fiber is still there, hurray!

Added benefit when you’re maligned this with spinach: the lemon juice in the Smoothie provides vitamin c which is essential for your body to absorb the iron from the spinach!

Ingredients

  • 2 handful of Spinach leaves (or stemmed lake or collards, chopped)
  • 1 ripe banana
  • 2 cups water
  • Juice of 1 large lemon
  • 2-3 tbsp coconut/palm sugar, or honey or agave syrup (add more if you like it sweet)
  • (Optional: 2 tbsp egg white powder or protein powder)
  • You could also add a peeled Kiwi

Directions

  1. Place greens in the blender and add the two cups of water, pulse a few times to get started, pushing down the top layer of leaves if they don’t incorporate.
  2. Add the banana, lemon juice, sugar and if using protein powder. Pulse and blend until smooth
  3. Serve. Makes about 4 cups

Note: you should drink this right away, don’t make it in advance, first the Smoothie separates into solids and liquid pretty quickly (I just re-blend for the second glass) but secondly the nutrients that were happily stored inside the leaves are now exposed to the air and will start oxidizing and therefore loose potency.

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Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Chocolate Balls

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Schockolade Kugeln – Chocolate Balls – Swiss Christmas Cookies

You’re not surprised that a lot of Swiss cookies involve chocolate, are you?

This is another no butter recipe. It has an intense chocolate flavor and no added fat (only fat in here is from the almonds, eggs and cocoa powder). And as an added bonus, it just so happens that it is gluten-free, tadaa!

At first I was going to translate the name of these into bullets, as in ‘death by chocolate (bullet)’ but was musing on the whole Christmas and Peace on Earth concept and thought that would seem kinda wrong, but nevertheless they are intensely chocolatey!

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Ingredients

    • 3 eggs
    • 1 1/2 cups sugar
    • 1 3/4 cups cocoa powder (I used a mix of extra dark and dutch processed)
    • 3 3/4 cups ground almonds (sometimes called almond flour)
    • 2-3 tbsp tapioca or potato starch

Directions

    1. In a big bowl, mix eggs sugar and cocoa until liquid and frothy looking
    2. Add the almonds and the starch and mix until, uniformly incorporated
    3. Chill dough for a few hours (if it’s cold enough where you are, put it on the balcony like we did in Switzerland, if not the fridge works well too)
    4. Form into walnut sized balls between your hands, (being careful to keep your hands cool), and place on a lined baking sheet.
    5. Let the formed balls dry overnight, or to speed up the process, you could also place the whole cookie sheet in the freezer for at least 1 hour.
    6. Bake in a preheated oven at 480°F for 3 to 5 minutes. The balls should only crack slightly
    7. Let cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to cooling rack.

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Check out the post on more Swiss Christmas Cookies to try other varieties!

Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Thai Red Curry Chicken ‘Slow-Cooker Friday’

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I love Thai food and I am a little bit of a Thai food snob, I have to admit. But I guess it might come as no big surprise, after travelling in South East Asia extensively, and my brother living on an island in Thailand (I know, don’t get me started, he gets to enjoy the sun while we have cold toes here ;P ) While travelling and meandering through Thailand and other South East Asian countries, I ate with local families, and therefore ate some ‘Thai Food’ you’d never see in a restaurant, in short I acquired some first hand knowledge of real Thai cooking. So this recipe really should be called Thai Inspired Red Curry Chicken, since the slow cooker is not traditional, but the flavors are still reminiscent of warmer places, so this is my Americanized Friday evening version 😉

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Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 chicken legs/thigh quarters, bone in (about 1 1/2lb)
  • 2-4 tbsp red curry paste (if you are very sensitive to spice, use less, for extra spice use more)
  • 1/2 of a 14 oz can of coconut milk
  • 1 cup brown Jasmine rice
  • 1 cup broth
  • 2 cup mixed vegetables, cut into bite size pieces (preferably fresh, I used snow peas, red bell pepper, and broccoli)
  • 1 lime, cut into wedges for garnish

Directions

  1. Heat a heavy frying pan over medium.
  2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and cook the chicken skin side down until browned, about 4-6 minutes, turn and cook repeat on the other side (Chicken will cook more in the slow cooker, this is just to give it some extra flavor) Transfer to slow cooker
  3. To same skillet, add the coconut milk, half the broth and the curry paste. Stir and loosen any browned bits. Pour over the chicken in the slow cooker insert.
  4. Pour the rice around the chicken , add the remainder of the broth and cover.*
  5. Turn slow cooker on low and cook for 5-6 hours, or until chicken is sift and starts to fall off the bone.
  6. Half hour before you’re ready to eat, place the vegetables on top and turn up to high. Alternately you could also steam the vegetables separate and serve over the chicken and rice from the crock-pot.
  7. Garnish with lime wedges and serve.

* The rice will be soft and flavorful from cooking in the sauce, if you prefer your rice to be less ‘risotto’ , add it about half way through the cooking time.

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Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Änisbrötli

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Änisbrötli – Anis Bread Cookies- Swiss Christmas Cookies

Änisbrötli (or Springerle as they are called in  Germany, but since I am from Switzerland we’re going with the former 😉 ) are flavored with, as the name implies anis. Make sure you get cleaned anis seeds, not fennel seeds. Many times I see fennel (the vegetable) labeled as anis in the store, but no no, not the same.

These are the coolest to make, and have been my favorite on and off for many years. So I am just writing this because originally I wanted to say they are my favorite, but realized that I think I might have said that about at least one two other cookies as well, soooo… But truthfully, they are all my favorites 🙂

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Please don’t think you can’t make these just because you don’t have one of the special pretty molds (called “Model” in German) I used here. You could of course, depending on what part of the country you live in, look for antique molds at yard sales or flea markets, or I think these lovely folks might ship overseas as well. But as you can see in the picture, they are fabulous also when made with regular cookie cutters, or turned into “ChrĂ€beli” by forming dough pieces into a 3/4″ roll, cutting into 2″ pieces and cutting 2-3 times into each piece diagonally. Then bend them a little and proceed just like for all the other shapes.

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One thing that is super important, you have, have, HAVE to make these on a greased cookie sheet. No parchment paper, no silicone mat, greased cookie sheet. Otherwise they will not rise properly when baked and won’t form the characteristic ‘foot’ as seen in the picture above.

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Ingredients:

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups confectioners sugar
  • 1 tbsp anis seeds
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 4 1/4 cups flour

Directions

  1. Beat eggs and confectioners sugar together until very bubbly/frothy (By hand this can take 10 minutes or more, if you are using a hand held mixer, make sure to stir in the confectioners sugar before turning on, or you’ll have the potential for a dust explosion on hand, not good for your kitchen or your respiratory system, trust me)
  2. Stir in Anis and salt
  3. Mix in the flour, and using your hands if necessary, form into a ball
  4. Let rest in the cold for 1 hour
  5. To form the cookies, roll out dough on a floured surface until about 1/2″ thick, dust surface with some flour and press the mold deeply into the surface, cut out using a cutter or knife and place on a prepared greased cookie sheet.**
  6. Allow cookies to dry overnight
  7. The next day, preheat your oven to 305°F (yep, very low threehundredandfive, no typo)
  8. Bake at 305°F for 11 – 13 minutes. Cookies are supposed to get light brown on the bottom

**If you happen to not have any of the pretty form used, no worry. You can still make them, either just use regular cookie cutters, or make “ChrĂ€beli” by rolling the dough into a 1/2″ thick roll, and cut 3″ sections off, then using a sharp knife, make perpendicular slices being careful to not cut all the way. Bend slightly and place on the cookie sheet. You can see what a  “ChrĂ€beli” looks like in the first picture, bottom right.

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Pretty and yum!

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Check out the post on more Swiss Christmas Cookies to try other varieties

Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

MailÀnderli

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MailĂ€nderli – Lemon Scented Swiss Christmas Cookies

MailĂ€nderli are one of the quintessential Swiss Christmas cookies. The are just slightly sweet and appeal also to the folks in your life that don’t particularly have a sweet tooth. As kids we would eagerly await when my Mom would make these, and we’d help, help making the cutouts, mainly in the center of the freshly rolled out area (I am sure to my Mom’s delight) and of course, help eat the dough 🙂 To this day, my favorite cookie dough ever. It’s an awesome cookie to make with your little ones, just chill the dough well in between rolling out, since little helpful fingers and the extra time it takes doing this with kids, will warm it up and the MailĂ€nderli dough gets sticky when warm.

Traditionally these are just brushed with egg yolk, hence the pretty yellow color. But you can also bake them as is, and decorate them after they are cold (I used to do this with my babysitting kids, just like my Mom used to with us) by brushing them with a glaze made from  a couple of tablespoons confectioners sugar and a few teaspoons lemon juice or water, and a squeeze of beet juice for color (or food coloring, your choice). Add chocolate coffee beans, sprinkles or silver decorating pearls.

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Ingredients

  • 2 sticks butter, unsalted
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 lemon, grated peel
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 4 1/4 cups + 1 tbsp flour
  • 1 egg yolk for glaze

Directions

  1. Stir butter until soft and creamy
  2. Add sugar and stir until well mixed and there are little ‘bubbles’ forming on the bottom of the bowl
  3. Add the eggs, one at a time, stirring until mixed
  4. Add salt and lemon zest, then sift flour into mixture, stirring between additions. (The dough will seem rather soft for rolling out at this point) From into a ball, cover the bowl and refrigerate overnight
  5. Roll half the dough out on a little flour until a little over 1/4″ thick. Using your favorite cookie cutters, cut out shapes and place on lined baking sheet
  6. Place the sheet in the cold for a few minutes (specially if you are making cookies with kids) then brush the surface with the egg yolk and bake 6-10 minutes in the middle of the 400°F oven, or until just lightly golden brown on the bottom and the tops are shiny and yellow.

For a list of some other ones to try go to Traditional Swiss Christmas Cookies.

Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

ZimtstÀrnli

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ZimtstĂ€rnli – ‘Cinnamon Stars’ – Swiss Christmas Cookies

Another one of my all time favorites are the ZimtstĂ€rnli (meaning little cinnamon stars). Besides being super yummy, and they are really not all that hard to make, I think the fact that they are grain free, gluten free and the only fat they contain is from the ground almonds doesn’t hurt either, plus cinnamon has been shown to have blood sugar lowering properties.

Yes, these are cut outs again. And you could really make them any shape you like. You’ll just have to call them cinnamon elephants or whatever 😉 Traditionally rolled out on granulated sugar instead of flour, I suggest you use more ground  almonds instead.

Please be aware that most confectioners sugar contains corn starch.

These really should be made in every American household, just look at what they look like!

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 Ingredients

  • 3 egg whites
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 1/2/ cups confectioners sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp Kirsch (optional, you could leave it out or use lemon juice instead)
  • 3 1/2 cups ground almonds (almond flour)

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 480°F
  2. In a large clean bowl, beat egg white with a pinch of salt until stiff peaks form.
  3. Carefully fold in the sugar. Set aside a 1/4 cup plus 3 tbsp ( a scant 1/2 cup) of the mixture, reserve
  4. Carefully fold almonds, Kirsch (if using) and cinnamon under the rest of the egg white mixture. Form to dough and place in the fridge. Chill for at least 3 hours.
  5. Roll out about 1/4″ thick on more ground almonds/almond flour. Then make cookies using star shaped cookie cutter, place on lines baking sheet and brush with a layer of the reserved egg white glaze.
  6. Bake 5-6 minutes with a wooden spatula in the door of the oven to keep the door cracked and prevent it from closing all the way. This is helping in keeping the tops of the cookies white. (They are perfectly done when the bottom is slightly golden brown but the tops stay a pristine white)
  7. Cool on the cookie sheet for a few minutes before removing to cooling rack.

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Check out the post on more Swiss Christmas Cookies to try other varieties
Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Basler Brunsli

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Basler Brunsli – ‘Basler Brownies’ – Swiss Christmas Cookies

Holidays are getting closer and no matter what your faith, we all like to celebrate and in line with that, prepare special foods and treats (Oh yeah!)  We share meals and we share time with family and friends.

So does it come as a surprise that coming from Switzerland, I would have treats involving chocolate? Probably not. But maybe it will stun you to known that these contain absolutely no butter, (and no, I did not replace it with margarine or some other fake stuff), are gluten and even grain free, and that the only fat in them comes from the ground almonds (and cocoa)? How is that for a healthy treat? (Now that said, it still IS a treat, almonds though containing healthy fats, still are fatty)

A “FĂ€hri” (small passenger ferry) setting across the Rhine opposite the MĂŒnster Cathedral in Basel

Basel, on the cross roads of Europe, has long been a center of trade from exotic spices and tea to more mundane items, and having a traditional cookie involving chocolate and other luxury goods, isn’t surprising. So here adapted for the american kitchen: Basler Brunsli

Did you know?

  •  “Dark chocolate”, also called “plain chocolate” or “black chocolate”, is produced by adding fat and sugar to cocoa. It is chocolate with zero or much less milk than milk chocolate. The U.S. has no official definition for dark chocolate but European rules specify a minimum of 35% cocoa solids.[2] Dark chocolate can be eaten as is, or used in cooking, for which thicker, more expensive baking bars with higher cocoa percentages ranging from 70% to 99% are sold. Dark is synonymous with semisweet, and extra dark with bittersweet, although the ratio of cocoa butter to solids may vary
  • “Hershey process” milk chocolate is popular in North America. It was invented by Milton S. Hershey, founder of The Hershey Company, and can be produced more cheaply than other processes since it is less sensitive to the freshness of the milk. The process is a trade secret, but experts speculate that the milk is partially lipolyzed, producing butyric acid, which stabilizes the milk from further fermentation. This compound gives the product a particular sour, “tangy” taste, to which the American public has become accustomed, to the point that other manufacturers now simply add butyric acid to their milk chocolates.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 1/2 c ground almonds/almond flour, unblanched
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp tapioca starch (or cornstarch)
  • 2 egg whites
  • 3 1/2 oz extra dark or cooking chocolate, melted (use Lindt chocolate if available)
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tbsp Kirsch (optional; a clear Cherry Brandy)

Directions

  1. In  a big bowl, mix the first four ingredients.
  2. Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form (being careful not to overwork, you can only do this once)
  3. Add to the bowl with the almond mixture. Carefully fold in the beaten egg whites.
  4. In the meantime, melt the chocolate: Break into smallish pieces and either melt in a double boiler with a tablespoon water or (and this is the easier way) place in a bowl, cover with warm water and microwave at 30 second increments until the chocolate is soft and molten, then carefully pour off the water and stir smooth. Let cool slightly (so as not to cook the egg whites) then mix into the ingredients in the bowl.
  5. Refrigerate overnight or at least for several hours to firm and chill the dough
  6. Roll out on sugar (or sugar mixed with ground almonds) to about 1/2″ to 1/4″ thick.
  7. Cut out shapes using your favorite cookie cutter, place on lined baking  sheet and bake at 480°F  for 4-6 minutes (mine were perfect at 5) (if you bake them too long, they will get rock solid when cold)

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Check out the post on more Swiss Christmas Cookies to try other varieties

Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Traditional Swiss Christmas Cookies

It’s not Christmas without traditions and for me going without the cookies I grew up with is unthinkable. When I first moved to this country, I was suddenly faced with the challenge of making cookies that before I would just be able to buy at the local bakery, cookies I had never made before. yeah, I did not always make everything myself. But I needed them, I mean Christmas was NOT going to come without, so I was going to find a way and I was going to learn how to make them, whipped egg whites and all. Over the years I tried different substitutes for ingredients that are not readily available in the US, and have refined and tweaked the recipes to reproduce the flavors of my home without having to fly back and what not 😉

I grew up in Basel, a city on the Rhine that had extensive trade with spices, sugar and tea long before the rest of secluded Switzerland had ready access to such luxuries, and there is extensive use of (former) exotic spices. A lot of times the recipes also have a couple of tablespoons of local cherry brandy on the ingredient list (which can be left out without altering the result significantly)

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Over the years ground almond meal (aka almond flour) has become more readily available and my cookies turn out much better than when I tried blending the almonds in my food processor. Yeah, not a grinder, should have known, but driven by desperation (I wanted to have Christmas, after all) I sifted through the result and picking out most of the large remaining almond chunks.

Another challenge is the measurements. All my recipes are not only metric, but in grams, kilograms, deciliters and so forth. We measure ingredients by weight not volume, which I still believe gives you more accurate results in most cases, specially if you have to divide or multiply a recipe. But  for convenience in the American kitchen, I have converted all of the ingredients into imperial measurements, cups and so forth. So, worry not, no need to run out and get a food scale (although I do think it’s a good thing to have, just sayin’)

Many of the recipes that I will be sharing here are considerably healthier than your average cookie recipe. What usually happens when I bring them somewhere is this: people marvel at the different looks and how pretty it is, then they try one and are amazed that there is so much  flavor and not just plain sugary sweetness, and then they completely lose it when they learn that many of the cookies they just tried use no butter or oil and the only fat content is  natural oils from the ground almonds, many are gluten and even grain free ( a thing I never realized until this year)

There are four that absolutely HAVE to be on my list for a real Swiss Christmas,

Links will be updated as I update the recipes

Basler Brunsli (our local version of Brownies)

gluten free, grain free and butter free

MailÀnderli (delicately scented with lemon, these were always the first ones my Mom would bake each year)

 

 

ZimtstĂ€rnli (Cinnamon Stars, I think this one has great potential to become a American Favorite, given it’s shape, taste and color, not to mention taste)

gluten free, grain free and butter free

Änisbrötli (Anis breads/cookies )

fat free besides the eggs

 

And of course there are several other that are just as good and I try to make them too, but without those four, I don’t even care if it snows or not!

 

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 Chocolate Balls

Almonds and chocolate, what more could you want?

   Hazelnut Squares

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Spitzbuebe (Sablé like, translates to Rascals, I have heard them called Linzer Cookies in the US)

Orange Hearts

And I could go on and on

What is one thing that is absolutely essential to your holidays?

 

 

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Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade & Simone Kereit. All rights reserved

Lighter Asparagus Quiche

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Asparagus Bacon and Cheddar, what better combination could there be? Oh I know, a crispy pie crust to encase it all. A Quiche in this country a lot of times feels like an ‘egg pie’ to me, which can make it pretty heavy and rich. So for this recipe I only used 1 egg, and by adding greek yogurt, we up the protein content without adding a ton of fat or weighing down the filling. Serve with a big salad for a light lunch or dinner or with a side salad as a first course for a leisurely, sit down dinner.

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Okay so after all that pretty talk, here’s the truth: I made so many different traditional Swiss cookie dough recipes (you know, for Christmas I get homesick if I don’t have ‘my’ cookies), that I ran out of eggs, well, besides the one used here. So I had to make due with what I had on hand: 1 egg, flour/pie crust (there’s always pie crust), asparagus and some odds and ends.

Well, as so many times, when you find yourself in a tight situation, it leads to the discovery of something much better than expected…

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Ingredients:

  • Single pie crust
  • 1 lb asparagus
  • 1 oz Speck *, diced
  • 2 oz Gruyere (or cheddar), grated
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • salt to taste
  • 2 heaped tbsp Greek yogurt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 380°F
  2. Roll out pie crust 1″ bigger than pie pan, fold to place into pan, and roll edges under to make a thicker edge.
  3. Mix milk through Greek yogurt
  4. Cut any hard ends off of asparagus, then place them into the crust in two layers, the second layer at a right angle to the first. Break any asparagus that are too big into smaller pieces
  5. Distribute the Speck over the asparagus, then pour the milk egg mixture over everything, and sprinkle with the grated cheese.
  6. Bake in the middle of the oven for 35-40 min
  7. Serve hot or warm

*often translated as bacon, it however has much more meat than fat on it, but plain old bacon would do as well, just have the butcher cut you a thick piece you can then dice into cubes)

Serves 4 as a lunch/light dinner, or 8 as an appetizer.

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Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved

Pear Cranberry Almond Tart

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Looking through my collection of recipes, I realize I bake a lot. Well, I do love my oven, so there’s that. It’s nothing fancy or anything but its GAS. And it bakes the best bread, and pies, and tarts, and muffins and lasagna. 🙂 I love baking, did I mention?  And since cooking with gas, I will never, ever want to live in any place I cannot cook with gas (alright, if the choice is living in a house with an electric stove or living under a bridge…, but short of that)

And on to another fall/winter treat…

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Can you tell I got a good deal on pears recently? After shopping the local farmers market at the end of the day on Saturday, I suddenly found myself with bags of produce that now needs to be eaten. As for pears, it’s a race against time, as they are only at that ‘perfect ripe but not mushy’ state for so long, or should I say, so short. Sometimes it really seems like that window is measured in minutes not hours. So what’s a girl in possession of 12 pears to do? Well I made this, twice. And this deep dish pie uses another 6, so doing pretty good overall.

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I also have been on a quest for the perfect pie crust recipe and am trying out different ones to see what to add or subtract from my two standard go to recipes in order to make a perfect and foolproof everyday crust. But more on that after the study has been completed.  😉 Here I used an amazing flaky, slightly sweet, all  butter crust.

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So for this seasonal recipe besides using the abundance of pears in my kitchen, I used some cranberries. I think that the tartness of the cranberries very nicely offsets the sweetness of the ripe pears, but you could just as well leave the cranberries out. Almond and pear are a natural match and a lot of fancy French pastry draws on that flavor combo, you can do the same here, just easier.

imageFresh in the oven

You will need a Deep dish pie plate

Ingredients

  • Single pie crust (home made or store bought, your choice)
  • 6 medium pears * see note
  • 1 cup cranberries
  • 3/4 ground almond
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup almond milk (or dairy, if you prefer)
  • 1/3 cup sugar (i used coconut/palm sugar)
  • 1 tbsp coconut flour (you could use cornstarch instead)
  • 1 tsp almond extract (you could also use vanilla)

* note: I used pear the size of your fist, like the ones that come in 3lb bags at the grocery store; if you use bigger ones, you might need less

Directions

  1. Roll out pie crust about 1-2″ bigger than the pie dish. Fold crust in half and in half again to easily transfer it to the baking dish. Refrigerate
  2. Preheat oven to 400°F
  3. In a bowl or 4 cup measuring cup, mix the eggs, sugar, ground almond and almond milk. Then  add the coconut flour and the almond extract. Beat with a fork until well mixed.
  4. Wash pears and cut in half, core and cut each half into 4 slices (you should have 8 slices per pear)
  5. Remove crust from refrigerator, arrange pears in circles into the crust, layering the cranberries in between (or if you almost forget like me, just put them over top the pear before it goes in the oven). You should end up with two layers of sliced pear.
  6. Pour the filling over the pears into the pie pan, doing circles as you pour to distribute evenly
  7. Bake for about 35-40 minutes or until the filling is set and not liquid any longer.
  8. Serve warm or at room temperature!

imageand that’s light Asparagus Quiche in the background

Copyright © 2011 Simple Healthy Homemade. All rights reserved