Adding Beads to your Knitting

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Adding Beads to your Shawl

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Knitted Cast on with Picots

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Knitted Cast On with Picots

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Charts Pt.2

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 Working from charts Pt.2

[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]When stitches start doing different things than going straight up and down, there are increases and decreases involved. Depending on how these are offset or staggered, and what type of increase or decrease is used, the direction of some of your stitches changes. Let’s have a closer look[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0008.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/k2tog-simple.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Here you can see little holes (the yarn overs) and to the right what looks like a column of knit stitches but at a decided angle to the right. The background is stockinette (the columns of knit stitches that run straight up)
and the slanted row that leans to the right, those are k2tog, followed by a yo.[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]On a chart, this is what one of those slanted rows looks like. Pretty similar, no?
Remebering to read the chart right to left, you know the pattern here involves k2tog, yo with a number of knit stitches before and after that.[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0003.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/ssk-simple.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]This swatch shows a very similar pattern, but this time the column of knit stitches slants to the left. The directional decrease shown here is a ssk, or slip, slip, knit. So the stitches get turned (by slipping them one at a time) and then knit together through the back, in effect reversing and mirroring the decrease we looked at above.[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]On a chart, this is what one of those slanted rows looks like. The slanted lines on the chart are decreases, and you can see the same slant as in the stitches in the swatch to the left.[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/k2tog-repeat-b.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Most of the time, when you are working from a chart, there will also be a visible border to tell you which stitches need to be repeated.
Most knitted things are not just 10 stitches wide after all, unless you are making a broomstick cozy!
In the example chart to the left here, you are looking at a chart with a k2tog, yo combo again, but this time the chart tells you that you need to work the stitches within the blue border multiple times.[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]
You find the same thing in your written patterns in a variety of ways:
Often there will be
(round brackets) or
[Square ones]
or it will say something like * repeat from * to last 4 sts.

[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]For this chart above, you need to knit the stitch before the blue border, then work the 8 stitches in the repeat how ever many times the pattern tells you, and you finish with working one more knit stitch, to the left of the blue repeat outline.[/x_text][x_image type=”none” src=”” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]

Please download the file below and work through the exercises on the wroksheet to follow along the rest of this tutorial

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Download Worksheet 1

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Working from charts

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 Working from Charts Pt.1

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Part 1 : The basics

Learning to work from charts is a great skill to take your knitting to the next level, many of the more complex patterns (and increasingly patterns in books and magazines) are available charted only, for a variety of reasons.

First off is that it allows the user to have a visual representation of the item they are creating and it’s therefore easier to spot mistakes as you knit.

Another reason is space, and that is why magazines, where page space is at a premium, use charts for almost anything.

To some this may sound like a scary new invention, but most colorwork traditionally has been charted, many cabled designs as well; and all the old German lace patterns are charts only.
When you start out having knit from long strings of syntax, charts might seem daunting, but with a little practice working from a chart which is a visual representation of your work, will become second nature and you’ll ask yourself, why you didn’t make the switch earlier.
No different from when you started to learn to read patterns and had to learn that k2tog meant ‘knit 2 stitches together as if they are one stitch’, or yo meant ‘yarn over’ you will soon form the mental link between a symbol that slants to the right and a k2tog or a O and a yarn over! Or a block of yellow with having to knit that stitch in yellow.
So let’s get started with some of the basics. One thing you want to determine when looking at a chart is what type of chart is it? Color work, cable, or lace? Or a bit of everything?[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/color-chart.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”left-text “]The colorwork charts are super easy, each block is a stitch, and you work the stitch in the color shown, so we won’t go into too much detail on those at this point.
In this example you would have 4 stitches, and row 1 is worked knit 2 in brown, and then knit 2 in white.

[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”left-text “][/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]What we will look at first in our series of tutorials here are simple lace charts. Keep in mind, some of the basic formulas apply to all charted knitting patterns.
The first thing you always want to do is determine if the chart shows RS only, or if it has both RS and WS rows on it.

Often the accompanying text will clue you in on this.
Another indicator is to look for the row (or round) numbers:
If they are on the right side only, your chart is only showing you right side rows.
If they are on both sides, alternating like int he bottom example, the chart shows you both RS and WS rows.
(Note: Large charts sometimes have numbers on both sides to make it easier to read, but they would be on the same row)
[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/chart-combined.png” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”left-text “]The RS only or both sides is very important for how you read the chart!
Since charts are a visual representation of your knitting as seen from the right side, they are read in the direction you knit,
i.e. from right to left on RS rows, and left to right on WS rows.
The first few charts we will look at, are going to only represent the RS of your work, all WS rows in our example are worked across in stockinette stitch (i.e. purled across on the WS)
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Our first chart shows some rows of yo and k2tog combinations.

First we determine what rows the chart shows:
The row numbers are on the RS only, and notice how there are only odd numbers of rows? That is another good clue that your chart is skipping every other row, namely the wrong side rows!

And there normally is a key to let you know what stitches are used in the chart: For this first chart you would need to know only 3 symbols to be able to read the chart successfully:

  • the white box is a knit stitch,
  • the O is a yarn over
  • and the / is a k2tog.

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Visual representation

First I want you to have a good look at your stitches, I am sure you already know that knitted stitches look a little like a V and purled stitches form a bump. But see in the examples below how some of the stitches slant to one side or the other?[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0012.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/purl.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0008.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0014.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/IMG_0011-1.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”center-text “]Click here for Part 2 of our Chart tutorial series[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section]

Garter Tab

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Garter Tab Cast On

[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_video_embed no_container=”false” type=”16:9″][/x_video_embed][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_103454.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=” “]1.

Cast on 3 sts[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 20px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]

2.

Knit back and forth in garter stitch for the amount of rows the pattern states: For Khyber Pass that is 19 rows. (I think I only knit 13 rows here.)[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_103426.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_103338.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=” “]3.

turn your little strip 90 degrees, so one long side is on the top.[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 20px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]

4.

Pick up and knit stitches along the long edge.
Here I picked up 6 (3 are the original 3 from before you turn, see?).
In Khyber Pass you will pick up 9 sts.[/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_103256.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_103156.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=” “]5.

Pick up and knit 3 more stitches from the cast on edge.
(Yes it sort of bends the little strip a bit)[/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 20px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]

6.

This is what it looks like in a finished shawl.
It blends in perfectly and you can’t tell where exactly it was![/x_text][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/2″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_image type=”none” src=”http://owlcatdesigns.flywheelsites.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/20160130_102640.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “] [/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “] [/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “] [/x_column][/x_row][/x_section][x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 45px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text][/x_text][/x_column][/x_row][/x_section]

Karakorum

[x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 20px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ accent=”true” class=”center-text “]Karakorum[/x_custom_headline][x_gap size=”10px”][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]This generously sized crescent shaped shawl is worked top down in shifting colors with optional beading. The textured stitches gradually become lacier as the shawl progresses outwards, representing approaching mountain ranges that gradually draw near on the long journey along the Silk Road.
Except for a few rows at the border and the double yarnovers in the first lace pattern, most of the shawl is patterned on right side rows only, allowing for resting rows on the wrong side.[/x_text][x_line][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Silk Road

Through deserts dry and mountains high
past snow and ice and deep blue skies.
From lands of sunrise way afar
We make our way to reach Kashgar.

From far we come and far we walk
from dawn each day till it gets dark.
Dark loom the mountains, drawing near
through foothills steep, valleys appear
and glaciers glint in fading light
snow capped peaks come into sight.

Charted instructions only

Yarn
1 Neighborhood Fiber Co. Rustic Fingering Gradient
Set (100% Superwash Merino; 1250 yards / 1143 m
per set), Sample in Shades of Umber
1 skein Neighborhood Fiber Co. Rustic Fingering
(100% Superwash Merino; 475 yards / 434 m per
skein), Sample in Woodberry
or approx.1350 yds/ 1235 m fingering weight yarn

Needles
US 6 (4 mm) min 32″/ 80cm circular needle to hold
large number of stitches, or size to obtain gauge
Needle two sizes larger for Border

Gauge
24 st and 30 rows = 4″ / 10 cm in stockinette st

Finished Size
92″/ 234 cm wingspan tip to tip, 28″/ 71 cm center
back depth

Notions
6/0 Beads, approx. 1850 sz ( 400 Miyuki Matte Metalic
Khaki Iridescent and 1450 Silver Lined Crystal)
Crochet hook or tool for preferred beading method.
Tapestry needle

[/x_text][x_line][x_text class=”center-text “]

All patterns have been professionally edited.

Available to all Explorer Shawl Club members as an early download here
(right click, then save as)

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Khyber Pass

[x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 20px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ accent=”true” class=”center-text “]Khyber Pass[/x_custom_headline][x_gap size=”10px”][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]Khyber Pass is a striking top down crescent shaped shawl with lace sections that alternate with a garter and eyelet pattern.
The garter ridges add warmth and substance for your trip over the high mountains and the lace, inspired by snowcapped summits and frost, adds an element of lightness.
All wrong side rows are rest rows, making for a relaxing yet satisfying knit.[/x_text][x_line][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Silk Road

Through deserts dry
and mountains high,
past snow and ice
and deep blue skies,

We travel on,
starting at dawn,
on paths that take us further west,
‘cross passes high, ere we may rest.

Full written and charted instructions

Yarn
Bijou Basin Ranch Lhasa Wilderness (75% Yak down,
25% Bamboo; 250 yards / 228 m per 2.7 oz skein)
1 skein each in Sassenach (color A), Jacobite (color B)
and Skye (color C)
or
Sport weight yarn, 250 yds/ 229 m each, color A, B, C
Needles
US 6 (4 mm) min 32”/ 80cm circular needle to hold
large number of stitches, or size to obtain gauge

Gauge
18 st and 32 rows = 4” / 10 cm in stockinette st

Finished Size
65”/ 165 cm wingspan tip to tip, 16”/ 40 cm center
back depth

Notions
Tapestry Needle

Stitch marker *(optional)

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All patterns have been professionally edited.

Available as part of Silk Road 2016 Shawl Club: Wayfarer for $36 here

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Wintersilk

[x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 20px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ accent=”true” class=”center-text “]Wintersilk[/x_custom_headline][x_gap size=”10px”][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]Ever since making Rinde, I have been in love with textured single loop cowls. Warm yet not bulky, they snug into your coat without gaping, and never give you that ‘turtleneck choke-hold’ feel!
The Winter Silk Cowl comes in two lengths, for those knitters who share my love for single cowl snuggliness, as well as those of you who prefer the double-wrapped infinity look.
This cowl is worked in the round using a deep, cushy stitch pattern that looks like it consists of two distinct layers of fabric. I-cord cast on and bind off complete an elegant, finished look.[/x_text][x_line][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Materials
Yarn
Mountain Colors ‘Winter Silk’ (50% wool/50% silk, 200 yards/183 m, 3 oz/90g).
Sample shown in ‘Winter Sky’ Sizes A (B) use approx. 180 (370) yards /165 (338) meters of DK weight yarn.

Needles
US Size 7 (4.5 mm) circular needle, 16”(40 cm), or size to obtain gauge, plus needles one size larger for CO only.

Gauge
20 st = 4” on US 7 (4.5 mm) needles over Winter Silk Pattern Stitch

Notions
1 stitch marker

Finished Sizes
21 (42)”/ 53 (107) cm circumference 7”/ 18 cm high, all sizes[/x_text][x_line][x_text]

All patterns have been professionally edited and tested.

Available on Ravelry for $6.50

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Schaumkronen

[x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 20px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ accent=”true” class=”center-text “]Schaumkronen[/x_custom_headline][x_gap size=”10px”][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text class=”right-text “]Fully written and charted instructions

Top down cowlette is started flat and first knit like a triangular shawl, then joined in the round in the classic cowlette shape. Quick to knit up, this easy to wear little gem that won’t slide off your shoulders adds just the right touch of elegance to any wardrobe!

Schaumkronen (lit. Crowns of foam) are what is commonly known as whitecaps or white foam crests, this happens at a strong breeze or at about a windspeed of 6 on the Beaufort scale.[/x_text][x_line][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Riversong

When storm clouds roll towards the shore
and seagulls’ cries, loud just before
get drowned out in the thundering sound
of waves that wash up and then pound,
up on the rocks, with shore in sight,
my waves are crowned in caps of white!

Fully written and charted instructions

Yarn
Sweet Georgia Cashluxe Fine 1 skein each in 2 colors (70% Superwash Merino, 20% Cashmere, 10% Nylon; 400 yards / 365 m per 4oz/115g skein)
OR Fingering weight yarn 225 yards MC and 90 yards CC

Sample in MC ‘Hush’ and CC ‘Birch’

Needles
US 5 (3.75 mm) 24”/ 60 cm circular needle, or size to
obtain gauge

Gauge
22 st and 28 rows = 4” / 10 cm in stockinette st

Finished Size
25.5”/ 65 cm neck opening, 22”/ 56 cm depth at center
front, 6” / 15 cm depth at center back

Notions
5 Stitch markers
Tapestry Needle[/x_text][x_line][x_text]

All patterns have been professionally edited and tested.

Available on Ravelry for $7.

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Fingge

[x_section style=”margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 20px 0px 45px 0px; “][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_custom_headline level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ accent=”true” class=”center-text “]Fingge[/x_custom_headline][x_gap size=”10px”][/x_column][/x_row][x_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”” style=”margin: 0px auto 0px auto; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_column bg_color=”” type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]These slippers are like wearing handmade sheep on your feet, little clouds of comfort!
Worked in one piece, the sole is knit back and forth and is HEAVILY thrummed to give extra cushioning. The sides are worked in the round and the instep is again worked back and forth with a few shortened rows to bring the back of the slipper up and leave the front lower for easy in and out!
And in case you are wondering, ‘Fingge’ simply means slippers in Swissgerman, my native tongue.
Here’s to warm toes for everyone![/x_text][x_line][/x_column][x_column bg_color=”” type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px; “][x_text]Materials
Yarn
1(1, 2) skein(s) Briggs & Little ‘Heritage’ (100% Wool, 215 yds/197 m per
4 oz/113 g)
165(200, 240 yds) / 150(185, 220) m

Roving
Malabrigo ‘Nube’ (100% Merino, unspun wool roving 4oz/113 g)

Sample used 1 skein Briggs & Little in Mulberry and 3/4 braid Malabrigo Nube in Archangel

Needles
2 US Size 6 (4 mm) 24 or 32” circular needles, or needles for preferred method of working small circumferences in the round, or size to obtain gauge

Gauge
14-15 st and 26 rows = 4”/10 cm in thrummed pattern
18 sts and 28 rows= 4”/ 10cm over plain stockinette st

Notions
2 stitch markers, optional suede slipper soles (or plush paint or silicone non-slip sealant)

Finished Sizes
to fit foot 9½, 10½, 11¼ length and 7(9, 11) circumference.[/x_text][x_line][x_text]

All patterns have been professionally edited and tested.

Available on Ravelry for $6.50

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